Adam Meyer, The Nation’s Top Sports Handicapper to Earn $1.5 Million Dollars if the St. Louis Cardinals Win the World Series

It has been reported that Meyer won upwards of $2.8

Million dollars based on a combination of wagers in which he had the

Green Bay Packers picked to win the Super Bowl at 12-1 odds before the

playoffs began.

Meyer placed his wager with the M Resort and Casino in Las Vegas,

Nevada. Meyer then placed a $25,000 wager on Animal Kingdom to

win the Kentucky Derby at 26-1 odds netting him over $500,000.

Meyer is often referred to as the nation’s top sports handicapper and

“Handicapper to the Stars” by E! TV. In 2011 Adam Meyer Published Real Money Sports Magazine

and introduced his iPhone application, Adam Wins, that debuted on itunes

September 23. Each week, it is estimated that $10 million dollars are wagered

based on his advice. Louis Cardinals to win the World Series before the playoffs began. Adam appears weekly on more than a dozen radio

shows across the country from KNBR in San Francisco to WEEI in Boston.

Adam has been featured or referenced in USA Today (Reid Cherner), ESPN

Insider (Chad Millman), CNBC (Darren Rovell), The Wall Street Journal,

E! TV, Fox Sports Net, NBC, ABC, Cigar Aficionado and The Las Vegas

Review Journal. As the world markets

continue to become more unstable, many are looking toward sports

wagering as a safer way to find a return on a short term investment than

the stock markets. Meyer is known as one of the

industry’s biggest gamblers, and is regularly featured on sports-talk

radio stations across the country.

Photos/Multimedia Gallery Available: http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/mmg.cgi?eid=50033807&lang=en

Meyer’s ability to hedge and treat sports wagering as a business, has

inspired thousands to follow this popular trend. Meyer has documented wagers including a $300,000

wager on the Arizona Cardinals during the 2009 NFL playoffs and a $1

Million dollar wager on the Indianapolis Colts during the 2010 Super

Bowl.

“I felt strongly about the way the Cardinals had ended the regular

season,” said Adam Meyer. “Add the equation of the veterans in the

lineup and ace pitcher, Chris Carpenter, there was definitely value at

15-1 odds.”

About Adam Meyer

Adam Meyer has been in the sports handicapping business for over 23

years. Meyer has proven that understanding where there is

line value and knowing when and who to bet on, has become a very

profitable formula for both Meyer and his thousands of clients.

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Adam Meyer, President and CEO of Real Money Sports, Inc., operator of

sports handicapping website www.adamwins.com,

the leading online sports picks provider, placed a $100,000 wager on the

St. Meyer separates himself from others

in his industry by placing large wagers on the same games he advises to

his clients who subscribe to his service at www.AdamWins.com.

. Meyer received 15-1 odds, which would provide him with a $1.5

million dollar payday should the Cardinals win.

While each wager is unique, Meyer has a track record of placing, and

winning, large bets on major sporting events including the Super Bowl

and Kentucky Derby. For more information, visit http://www.adamwins.com.

“These bets are not about gambling, these wagers are more about a

business opportunity and ability to hedge and have the possibility of

making a substantial amount of money regardless of who wins the World

Series,” said Adam Meyer about the way a professional sports handicapper

treats his investments.

Two wagers that have garnered a lot of attention for Meyer over the past

year involved the Green Bay Packers Super Bowl win and Animal Kingdom’s

Kentucky Derby win

2008 World Series Ratings Could Be Worst in Televised World Series History, According to BetOnline.com Odds Makers

Louis Cardinals defeat the Detroit Tigers in five

games. Evan Longoria is a

slight favorite to win the 2008 World Series Most Valuable Player at

6-to-1, followed closely by Ryan Howard (7-to-1) and Carlos Pena

(8-to-1).

PANAMA CITY, Panama–(BUSINESS WIRE)–According to BetOnline.com – the No. All television odds are based on Nielsen ratings.

World Series Television Ratings Breakdown

About BetOnline.com

A year after FOX’s coverage of Boston’s

four-game sweep of the Colorado Rockies drew the second lowest ratings

average in televised World Series history (a 10.6 share), the line for

the 2008 Series’ average is currently at a

10.2 share – a difference of almost 500,000

viewers.(a)

To receive more information or schedule an interview with a

BetOnline.com representative, contact Grant Marek at Formula at (310)

578-7050 or via e-mail at marek@formulapr.com.

. Game 1 of that series drew an 8.0.

The lowest ratings average in World Series history (10.1) came in 2006,

which saw the St. The line for Game 1 of the

2008 World Series is currently at a 9.5 share.

BetOnline.com is one of the fastest-growing and most reliable online

wager portals, delivering the most exciting and dynamic wagering

experience on the Web.

BetOnline.com is headquartered in Panama City, Panama.

2006 World Series Share: 10.1 (Lowest in televised World Series

history)

2007 World Series Share: 10.6 (Second lowest in televised World

Series history)

Predicted 2008 World Series Share: 10.2 (According to

BetOnline.com)

Tampa Bay is the favorite at BetOnline.com to win the 2008 World Series

(-150), while Philadelphia remains a 6-to-5 underdog. In addition to a comprehensive sportsbook that

covers all games in the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL, NCAA and more, the site also

offers complete racebook and casino action and a myriad of propositional

bets. 1 online

sportsbook in the world – the 2008 World

Series could be one of the lowest-rated October Classics in the sport’s

105-year history.

(a) Television share is the percentage of television sets in use

tuned to the program. BetOnline.com offers same-day payouts and is one of the few

revered wagering companies to have its sports odds listed on Yahoo.com

The Best Horse Racing Books

A meticulously researched account of Seabiscuit’s rags to riches story, as well as that of his owner, trainer, and jockey.

Kinky Handicapping by Mark Cramer

Cramer is one of the most entertaining and thought-provoking handicapping writers there is, and Kinky Handicapping is his magnum opus. A must for every horseplayer’s bookshelf.

The Odds Must Be Crazy by Len Ragozin

Ragozin is the creator of the famous “Sheets” performance figures (which some consider a bargain at $25 a pop), and this autobiography cum handicapping tome gives a broad overview of how the numbers are created as well as how their users employ pattern matching to find live horses that may offer solid value in the mutual pools. A great book to dip into when a losing streak has you looking for new ideas.

What are the best horse racing books?  Horse Racing has an excellent body of literature that surpasses most sports in its quality and variety. The focus here is on non-fiction books, although there’s no shortage of fictional horse racing books. Sadly, several of the books mentioned here are out of print, but they can often be found on ebay or at abebooks. Cramer virtually invented the idea of unconventional handicapping as a way of uncovering hidden value, and here he offers ways to use pedigree handicapping, company lines, and other contrarian methods to beat the speed handicappers at their own game.

Handicapping Magic by Michael Pizzolla

There haven’t been a lot of additions to the body of handicapping knowledge since the glory days of the 70’s and 80’s, but former Sartin disciple Pizzolla at least contributes something new with his Balanced Speed Ratings and Fulcrum Pace. Meadow is a serious player and the information here is rock solid.

The Winning Horseplayer by Andrew Beyer

Written in 1983 it’s still an excellent introduction to trip handicapping and how to relate trips to speed figures. Here are my choices for the best horse racing books.

Handicapping Books

Thoroughbred Handicapping State of the Art by William Quirin

Quirin was among the first to do a major computer study of American horse racing. If you’ve ever wanted to know about feet-per-second calculations, early, late and sustained pace, decision models, track profiles and all the other tools of high-tech pace handicapping, this is the place to start.

Speed Handicapping by Andrew Beyer

By the time this was written in 1993, speed figures had lost most of their value in the parimutuel pools, but Beyer is nothing if not a die hard figure player. Crist is a pick six specialist, and his treatment of how to use multiple tickets to tackle that difficult bet is well worth the price of the book.

The Best of Thoroughbred Handicapping by James Quirin

Quinn was the most prolific of handicapping writers in the 80’s and 90’s. In this book, recently republished by DRF Press, he brings together a comprehensive overview of most aspects of modern handicapping theory. In addition to an excellent chapter on money management, Mitchell teaches you how to calculate the cost of any exotic wager, make an odds line, as well as how to know when a bet is offering value on the tote board.

Secretariat: The Making of a Champion by William Nack

Nack is a long time Sports Illustrated writer who had unprecedented access to the great Secretariat and his connections during “Big Red’s” amazing career. Quinn gives an introduction into how figures are made, as well as their application as part of the general handicapping process. Beyer on Speed gives a solid overview of how speed figures are made as well as how they might be employed for betting success. Crist, an executive and columnist with the Daily Racing Form, has ably filled that hole with this book, which offers some solid strategies for tackling both single and multi-race exotics. The information is certainly a bit dated, but there’s still lots of good food for thought considering the book was published 25 years ago.

Modern Pace Handicapping By Tom Brohammer

If you only read one book about pace handicapping, this should be the one. It also requires solid money management, and that’s where Commonsense Betting comes in. The book is more notable for its exiting narrative than its handicapping secrets, but speed figures and track bias played a large part in his success.

Exotic Betting by Steven Crist

Most of the best handicapping books were written before exotic betting came to dominate the mutual pools, and this has left a big hole in the literature for horseplayers seeking the big score. Not a great place to start for the novice, but well worth reading for more experienced players.

My $50,000 Year at the Races by Andrew Beyer

Andy Beyer always delivers a good read, and this account of his home run year of 1977 when he beat the races for 50 large while splitting his time between Gulfstream Park and the Maryland tracks is one of my favorite racing books ever. I’ve spent countless happy hours with this book revisiting some old friends as well as learning about the greats before my time. My favorite part of the book details Beyer’s expedition into the virgin territory of Australian racing, where he attempted to use his figures to conquer the fat betting pools down under.

Stud: Adventures in Breeding by Kevin Conley

A behind-the-scenes look at the world of high-class breeding, where millions of dollars are at stake, and wealthy breeders roll the dice as they “breed the best to the best and hope for the best.” Conley gives as a look into the breeding life of the great sire Storm Cat, as well as the Godolphin breeding operation, where Dubai’s Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum spends tens of millions trying for that elusive Derby winner

The Race for the Triple Crown by Joe Drape

New York Times writer Joe Drape gives an excellent history of a year on the Derby Trail among the high class stables of New York, a world far removed from the scrape-along lifestyle at most race tracks.

Money Secrets at the Racetrack by Barry Meadow

Many consider this the best book ever written on money management and the mathematical aspect of value betting and exotic betting. Nack gives us a ring side seat for all the twists and turns leading up to his incredible Triple Crown Campaign. This book covers speed and pace figures, Quirin Speed Points, pedigree handicapping on the grass, even trip handicapping. I particularly enjoyed Ragozin’s war stories about his experiences as a horse owner and bettor (he and his partner Len Friedman have poured millions into the parimutuel pools over the years). A great portrait of the greatest horse of all time.

Figure Handicapping By James Quinn

As the title suggests, speed and pace figures are the focus here.

Commonsense Betting by Dick Mitchell

Winning at the track takes more than good handicapping. Ragozin doesn’t give away the store here, but there’s still plenty of good information as well as an enjoyable read for horse racing fans.

Laughing in the Hills by Bill Barich

Barich is a terrific writer, and here he gives a wonderful account of bumming around the Northern California racing circuit in the late 1970s, marking time and getting to know the colorful denizens of the Golden Gate Fields backside.

General Interest Horse Racing Books

Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand

A book that hardly needs an introduction, given the sensation it made when published. MPH contains a complete overview of the classic Sartin Methodology by its best-known (and perhaps most successful) practitioner. Beyer always interleavens his handicapping books with lots of good stories that bring out the magic of the track from the bettor’s point of view.

. I’ve divided this article into two sections, one focusing on handicapping books, and the other on more general interest books. Davidowitz gives a solid treatment of virtually all aspects of handicapping from speed and pace handicapping to workouts, conditioning, trainers, pedigree, and betting strategy. He also provides a figure method for the turf based on late speed as a deciding factor.

Horse of a Different Color by Jim Squires

A great account of what it’s like to be a small time breeder by Jim Squires, the former Chicago Tribune editor turned thoroughbred breeder who hit the big time when he bred the Kentucky Derby winner Monarchos.

Champions by Daily Racing Form Staff

An awesome collection of lifetime past performance for every eclipse award winner since the 1890’s. I can’t imagine a horse racing fan who won’t enjoy paging through this book.

Betting Thoroughbreds by Steve Davidowitz

For my money this is the best general handicapping book ever written, and a great place to start for novices looking to expand their knowledge as well as more seasoned players looking to move up. There’s something about the beauty of the thoroughbred and the color of the backstretch that brings out the lyrical side of many writers